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Vitamin C

What is it?

One of the most well studied, safest and effective nutrients available, Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is a nutrient your body needs to form blood vessels, cartilage, muscle and collagen in bones.  As our bodies do not naturally produce vitamin C, we usually get them from fruits and vegetables, including oranges, strawberries, kiwi fruit, bell peppers, broccoli, kale, and spinach.


Vitamin C is a normal skin constituent that is found at high levels in both the dermis and epidermis. Aging, however, causes a decline in vitamin C content in both the epidermis and dermis. Excessive exposures to UV light or pollutants (e.g., cigarette smoke and ozone) will also lower vitamin C content, primarily in the epidermis.


Benefits:

  • Boost collagen and ceramide production
  • Essential for collagen synthesis
  • Improves skin health
  • Strengths immunity
  • Manage blood pressure
  • Reduce risk of chronic illness including dementia and heart diseases

    Summary of Select Clinical Studies:

    • When combined with collagen, it increases collagen synthesis, accelerates bone healing after a fracture and reduces oxidative stress 1
    • Encourages production of white blood cells, boosting immunity 2
    • Shortens healing time 3

    References

    1.  DePhillipo, Nicholas N et al. “Efficacy of Vitamin C Supplementation on Collagen Synthesis and Oxidative Stress After Musculoskeletal Injuries: A Systematic Review.” Orthopaedic journal of sports medicine vol. 6,10 2325967118804544. 25 Oct. 2018, doi:10.1177/2325967118804544
    2.  Huijskens, Mirelle J A J et al. “Technical advance: ascorbic acid induces development of double-positive T cells from human hematopoietic stem cells in the absence of stromal cells.” Journal of leukocyte biology vol. 96,6 (2014): 1165-75. doi:10.1189/jlb.1TA0214-121RR
    3.  Desneves, Katherine J et al. “Treatment with supplementary arginine, vitamin C and zinc in patients with pressure ulcers: a randomised controlled trial.” Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland) vol. 24,6 (2005): 979-87. doi:10.1016/j.clnu.2005.06.011